How to Propagate Strawberries

How to Propagate Strawberries

Propagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner,How to Propagate StrawberriesStrawberries are one of the easiest plants to grow. As long as you are adequately watering them, they do not need much attention. The best part of growing strawberries is that they naturally want to spread and reproduce. This can be annoying if they are not properly contained and begin consuming areas that you don’t want them to. However, if your goal is to reproduce your strawberry plants, then you’re in luck because this post will cover just that: How to propagate strawberries.
Propagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate StrawberriesThis article is not about discussing strawberry plant care, or growing strawberries from seed, but, rather, reproducing them to increase the number of plants that you have. Strawberry plants naturally create what are called “runners.” Runners are little chutes that form and “run” off of the main plant.

If you’re looking to increase your strawberry yield, these runners should be cut as soon as possible because the plant will invest its energy into ensuring that those runners succeed. This takes away from the actual berry production of the plant. Therefore, if you’re not looking to clone these plants and simply want a higher yield, runners should be clipped immediately. However, if it is your goal to create even more strawberry plants, then follow these simple steps.

Process:

Propagating Strawberries, Soil, dirt, strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, How to Propagate StrawberriesThe first step is to fill a small container with some quality soil. If you have old containers from previous plants, you can repurpose those to save money. Other than recycled plant containers, we have used paper cups and biodegradable coconut fiber pots (link below). In our experience, the coconut fiber pots have worked best for us because once you’re ready to plant the runner, all you have to do is plant the entire pot, instead of uprooting it and replanting.Propagating Strawberries, paperclip, wire, strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate StrawberriesAfter you have filled a container with soil, the process is simple. Leave the runner attached to the mother plant and set the pot close enough to it that the runner will reach the soil. Using a bit of wire (we’ve used paper clips because they’re cheap), form a “v” shape.

Propagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate StrawberriesPropagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner,How to Propagate StrawberriesPropagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate Strawberries

Stake the runner down into the soil so that it is touching the surface of the soil. Don’t bury the runner in the soil, but, rather, stake it down just enough to meet the soil.

After you have the runner staked, water it thoroughly. Do not cut the runner away from the mother plant at this point either. You want to establish a healthy root system first; cutting the runner away from the main plant will simply kill it. Think of the runner’s cord as an umbilical cord; the mother plant is still feeding it necessary nutrients that, if cut too early, won’t be supplied to the plant.

Propagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate Strawberries

After a couple of weeks of watering and paying close attention the health of the newly started plant, you should notice the runner begin to look more like a strawberry plant. Soon after this, the cord running from the main plant should begin to look more brown in color. When the cord is completely brown and somewhat stiff, cut away the runner from the main plant. At this point, you can plant the runner into the ground or in a bigger pot.

Propagating strawberries really is that simple.

We would love to hear about your experience with propagating strawberries or about your gardening endeavors in general. Feel free to contact us or comment below!

Propagating Strawberries, Strawberry, strawberries, plant, plants, strawberry plant, garden, gardening, propagating, runner, How to Propagate Strawberries

 

              

 

 

Get Free Email Updates!

Signup now and receive an email once we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

2 Replies to “How to Propagate Strawberries”

  1. This is something we accidentally managed to accomplish earlier this season without even realizing it! Thank you for breaking it down and making it simple.
    Our strawberries produced really small and kind of disappointing fruit this past season. Any tips for a better yield?

    1. Hi Stephanie! We’re glad you enjoyed the post! Did you let the runners continue to grow? If so, that may explain your disappointing fruit size. If runners are allowed to grow, the mother plant will expend energy on ensuring the runners survive, which can cause berry production to decrease dramatically. Therefore, if you’d rather have a bigger, more abundant fruit (instead of more plants), then it’s a good idea to clip the runners ASAP. If your plants are a few years old, they begin to produce less fruit as they age as well. Also, make sure the crown (the area between the roots and the stems) isn’t buried. Hope that helps! Let us know if you have any other questions and thanks for stopping by our page!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *