Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables with a Food Dehydrator

Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables with a Food Dehydrator

Dehydrating, Fruits, vegetables, food, dehydrator, dehydrating, drying, preserving.Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables with a Food Dehydrator, dehydrator, food preservation, preserving food, prepping, canning, jarring

Dehydrating is a great way to preserve food for long-term storage. When properly dried and stored, fruits and vegetables can last up to a year or more. One should ideally use the freshest produce available. Overly ripened fruits and vegetables tend to not be as crisp as fresh produce. Here, we will discuss dehydrating fruits and vegetables with a food dehydrator.

Process:

No matter what fruit or vegetable that you are dehydrating, start by cutting it into roughly equal sized, one-inch pieces. Once you have cut the produce up, you can place it on the dehydrator racks. Some dehydrators have temperature settings and timers. The dehydrator that we own only has one temperature setting and no timer. Despite these limitations, it has always worked extremely well for us. Depending on what type of dehydrator you are using, set the appropriate temperature, and turn it on.  The dehydrating process can take anywhere from a few hours up to 24 hours, depending on how much and what type of produce you are dehydrating. Ensure that you check on the produce throughout the process to see if the food is drying evenly. Once the produce is no longer moist and feels evenly dry, you can remove it from the dehydrator. Let the freshly dried produce sit out on a table (we usually leave it on the drying racks) and allow it to cool before placing it in a storage container. Not allowing the produce to cool before putting it into a container can cause moisture within the container, which will cause the food to perish more quickly.

Storage:

You can buy mylar bags to store your dried food in; the bags seal tightly and don’t allow light to penetrate to the food, which will ensure food lasts a long time. If you’re frugal, like us, you can use old, repurposed jars or ziplock bags to store your dried food (just be sure to remove as much air as possible from the bags). Whatever storage device you use, store it in a cool, dry place. Only store one type of food in each storage container to avoid cross-contamination. If the food goes bad and gets moldy, throw it out. It may sound odd, but if a few bugs are found in the food after storing it for awhile, you can place it on a cooking sheet in the oven at around 300 degrees for 30 minutes; this will kill the bugs and any eggs, making the food edible again.

Rehydrating:

For most vegetables, the rehydration process is simple. Put the desired amount of food in a pot of water (remember the food shrinks a lot as it is dried, so don’t use too much), bring to a boil and simmer for about 20 minutes. Add salt to taste and enjoy! To rehydrate fruit, simply put the desired amount in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Let the fruit sit for 15 to 20 minutes, strain and enjoy!

We will share some of our favorite recipes on this page in the future. Do you dehydrate your own fruits and vegetables? We’d love to hear about your experiences! Comment below or contact us to tell us your story!

Dehydrating, Fruits, vegetables, food, dehydrator, dehydrating, drying, preserving, Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables with a Food Dehydrator, dehydrator, food preservation, preserving food, prepping, canning, jarring

 

              

              

 

 

Get Free Email Updates!

Signup now and receive an email once we publish new content.

We will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

3 Replies to “Dehydrating Fruits and Vegetables with a Food Dehydrator”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *